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Introduction: Some Preliminary Observations

  • Robert Castley

Abstract

The development of the Third World in the last thirty years can hardly be described as steady progress. In an almost desperate search for a panacea to the economic problems facing developing countries, many economists (and international agencies) have turned to the successful newly industrialized economies of East Asia to provide a model for economic development. Previously, Japan had been the centre of international attention, but many economists, deterred by the sheer complexity of the Japanese economy and society, have turned increasingly to what they presumed were more straightforward examples of rapid economic growth, such as Korea and Taiwan. These two economies are regarded almost as laboratories of successful economic development and of greater relevance to developing countries wishing to achieve similar development.

Keywords

Preliminary Observation Supply Side Macroeconomic Policy Foreign Technology Korean Economy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Robert Castley 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Castley
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Economics and Social StudiesUniversity of ManchesterUK

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