Iran and Central Asia: Responding to Regional Change

  • A. Ehteshami

Abstract

The proclamation by the Upper Chamber of the USSR Supreme Soviet on 26 December 1991 that ‘the Soviet Union no longer’ existed may not have been an earth-shaking piece of news, yet its repercussions have been rippling through the post-Cold War order, changing and shaping the emergent new international system. Having not previously considered the unthinkable, few countries were prepared for the aftershocks of the implosion of the Soviet Union and its impact on the global system and on regional theatres — least of all Moscow’s friends and allies. One such — recent — friend was Iran, whose leaders had been seeking closer economic and military ties with the Soviet superpower since 1988.

Keywords

Hydrocarbon Income Turkey Egypt Nigeria 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1997

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  • A. Ehteshami

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