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What is an interpersonally skilled nurse?

  • Paul Morrison
  • Philip Burnard
Chapter

Abstract

People view interpersonal skills, like caring, in different ways. This workshop develops another form of personal construct theory to explore how nurses view what constitutes an interpersonally skilled nurse. The procedure used in this workshop is similar to those used in the previous chapters but is an elaborated form of the repertory grid approach. The context of the use of the grid is also different.

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References

  1. Arnold, E. and Boggs, K. 1989 Interpersonal Relations: Professional communication skills for nurses. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  2. Burnard, P. 1989 Teaching Interpersonal Skills: A handbook of experiential learning for health professionals. Chapman & Hall, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Further reading

  1. Barnes, D.M. 1983 Teaching communication skills to student nurses — an experience. Nurse Education Today, 13 (2): 45–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Burnard, P. 1987 A Study of the Ways in which Experiential Learning Methods Are Used To Develop Interpersonal Skills in Nurses in Canada and the United States of America. Florence Nightingale Memorial Committee, London.Google Scholar
  3. Heron, J. 1989 The Facilitators’ Handbook. Kogan Page, London.Google Scholar
  4. Kagan, C.M. (ed.) 1985 Interpersonal Skills in Nursing: Research and Applications, Croom Helm, London.Google Scholar
  5. Miles, R. 1987 Experiential learning in the classroom. In P. Allen and M. Folley (eds) The Curriculum in Nursing Education. Croom Helm, London.Google Scholar
  6. Nelson-Jones, R. 1981 The Theory and Practice of Counselling Psychology. Holt, Rhinehart & Winston, London.Google Scholar
  7. Rogers, C.R. 1967 On Becoming a Person. Constable, London.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Paul Morrison and Philip Burnard 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Morrison
    • 1
  • Philip Burnard
    • 2
  1. 1.School of NursingQueensland University of TechnologyUK
  2. 2.School of Nursing StudiesUniversity of Wales College of MedicineUK

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