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Post-Independence Challenges

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Abstract

It is quite clear from Chapter 4 that, although African nationalists gave ‘seeking the political kingdom’ top priority, they also knew that political independence was a first and necessary step towards meeting other aspirations of the people. This chapter examines the prospects of advancement for black Namibians under the theme of ‘prosperity for all’. It also focuses on relations between South Africa and Namibia. It covers mainly the first five years after Namibia’s attainment of independence.

Keywords

  • Southern African Development Community
  • African National Congress
  • White Settler
  • South African Reserve
  • Investment Conference

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Notes

  1. Nujoma, ‘Address to the Nation on Independence Day by His Excellency, Sam Nujoma, President of the Republic of Namibia, 21 March 1990, Windhoek, Namibia’, Southern Africa Record, No. 58, 1990, p. 66.

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  4. See also, Roger Murray, ‘Minerals in Motion’, African Business, No. 198, April 1995, pp. 21–2; and ‘Waiting with Baited Braith’, Southern African Economist, April/May 1991, pp. 26–7

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  7. See, for example, Muvatera Ndjoze-Siririka, ‘Manpower Issues in Namibia: Prospects for Black Advancement’, SAPEM Vol. 3, No. 8, June 1990, p. 11;

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  8. UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, The Commonwealth Yearbook, 1992, (London: HMSO, 1992), p. 280.

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  10. Eddi Bellando, ‘Namibia Woos Overseas Companies’, Africa Recovery, Vol. 7, No. 2, October 1993, p. 12.

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  11. SAPEM, Vol. 7, No. 6, March 1994, p. 43; André du Pisani, ‘Rumours of Rain: Namibia’s Post-Independence Experience’, Africa Insight, Vol. 21, No. 3, 1991, p. 173

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  12. UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, The Commonwealth Yearbook, 1992; and Jeffrey Balch and Jan Nico Scholten, ‘Namibian Reconstruction and National Reconciliation’, Review of African Political Economy, No. 49, 1990, p. 89.

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  13. SWAPO, ‘SWAPO’s New Political Programme’, Namibia News, No. 12, 1976, p. 5.

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  14. See SWAPO, ‘SWAPO’s New Political Programme’, Namibia News, Vol. 9, No. 9, September 1976, pp. 6–7; and No. 12, pp. 5 and 8–9.

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  15. Herbstein, ‘Namibia: Jobs and Land’; Eddi Bellando, ‘Namibia Confronts the Land Question’, Africa Recovery, Vol. 7, No. 2, October 1993, pp. 9 and 26; and Sam Nujoma, ‘Namibia for Namibians’.

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  16. UN Institute for Namibia, Toward Agrarian Reform: Policy Options for Namibia (Lusaka: UNIN, 1979), p. 33.

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  17. See, for example, William Lindeke, ‘Namibia’s Second Year of Independence’, in SAPEM, Vol. 5, No. 8, May 1992, p. 30.

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  18. Pieter Esterhuysen, ed., South Africa in Subequatorial Africa: Economic Interaction, A Factual Survey, supplement to Africa Insight, Vol. 24, No. 1, 1994, p. 58.

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  19. See Du Pisani, ‘Rumours of Rain’, p. 176; and Johnny Pitswane, ‘Namibia and South Africa’, Africa Insight, Vol. 24, No. 1, 1994, p. 74.

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© 1996 Laurent C. W. Kaela

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Kaela, L.C.W. (1996). Post-Independence Challenges. In: The Question of Namibia. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-24996-1_8

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