Public Expenditure and Poverty in Namibia

  • Irene Tlhase
  • Tjiuai Kangueehi

Abstract

This paper examines the Namibian case of marginalisation, relating it to government expenditure particularly on education and health. This is done in the realisation that Africa still suffers from domination in the psychological sense: Africans behave as an appendage of the Western system, economically, culturally and socially. The designs of political leaders differ from the needs, expectations and aspirations of the people, and this weakness is partly responsible for Africa’s marginalisation. This situation will not be corrected until the direct involvement of the people is apparent through participatory democracy. If sub-Saharan Africa is to ensure economic security and sustainable livelihoods for its people, it needs to follow social and economic policies which address the most fundamental needs of the people, particularly vulnerable groups like women, youth, children and the rural and urban poor. The overall message of the Namibian experience of marginalisation is that patterns of public expenditure in the post-independence period largely fail to address these needs.

Keywords

Income Expense 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irene Tlhase
  • Tjiuai Kangueehi

There are no affiliations available

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