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The Yugoslav Dimension: Past and Present Trends

  • Gazmen Xhudo

Abstract

The creation of a Greater Croatian state supported by Italy (10 April 1941) saw all of Bosnia-Hercegovina incorporated by the Ustasi.1 Administered by Zagreb, Bosnia-Hercegovina was divided between German and Italian military zones. Many Muslims did not openly resent the establishment of Croatian rule.2 The Ustasi, however, lacked the political experience to administer effectively since many of the more capable Croat leaders were either held, neutralized or remained passive, giving way instead to ultra-nationalists with more zeal for revenge than rule. This included policies centred upon eradication of Serbs, their forced conversion to Catholicism, or simple expulsion from Croatia.3

Keywords

Communist Party Crisis Management Present Trend Federal Structure Secret Police 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Gazmen Xhudo 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gazmen Xhudo
    • 1
  1. 1.University of St AndrewsSt AndrewsUK

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