Priests at the Hustings: Ecclesiastical Electioneering in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

  • K. Theodore Hoppen
Part of the Institute of Latin American Studies Series book series (LASS)

Abstract

The nineteenth-century Irish electoral system was largely modelled upon that of England. The Act of Union of 1800 abolished the Dublin parliament and provided instead that at first 100 and later slightly more Irish representatives be sent to Westminster where they henceforth constituted about one sixth of all members of parliament. Constituencies were (as in England) divided between predominantly rural counties and more urban boroughs, while voting rights were generally confined to men aged at least 21 who possessed (or in some cases merely occupied) property to a certain value. Again, as in England, voting was public until 1872 and complex registration mechanisms existed to establish precisely who could and who could not proceeed to the poll.1

Keywords

Burning Europe Steam Coherence Dine 

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Notes

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© Institute of Latin American Studies 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Theodore Hoppen

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