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What Kind of Leadership do Voluntary Organisations Need?

  • Richard Kay
Chapter

Abstract

Writing in 1982, Mintzberg argued that management is what managers in the real world do, whereas leadership is an increasingly arcane concept, cultivated by academics and poorly related to any kind of practice. This view reflected widely held disillusionment of research into leadership at that time. Much of that research had been the study of the behaviour of those in leadership positions — the leader being identified as the person who had been formally designated as such. This research was usually based on positivist empiricist assumptions about how leadership can be known, and of how generalisable, lawlike relationships between variables are waiting to be discovered, for example the behaviour of the leader causing the attainment of organisational goals by followers.

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© Macmillan Publishers Limited 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Kay

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