Conclusions and Perspectives: The End of the War in the Mediterranean, Greece, and British Perceptions of Status, 1945–47

  • Matthew Jones
Part of the St Antony's book series

Abstract

This final chapter will begin by briefly outlining the final stages of the war in the Mediterranean and the disputes that still accompanied operational and command questions in the Italian campaign. It will then go on to look at the continuing British involvement in the Greek civil war and of how perceptions of British interests in the Mediterranean were going through significant qualifications by the late 1940s at the very moment when the advent of the Cold War brought the Americans into a more active role in the eastern Mediterranean and Near East. The material inability of Britain to continue supporting the Greek Government by early 1947 would symbolise an important moment for the Anglo-American relationship as the US stepped into the breach. It was to be over the conflict in Greece that the long hoped for US commitment to the Mediterranean would coalesce, not through reasons of American sympathy for Britain’s imperial security problems, but through a revised appraisal of US national interests, and not in conditions of ‘partnership’ but with the British relegated to the role of a minor, if not insignificant player. Finally some conclusions and reflections will be drawn from what has already been set down about the differing contemporary views of Britain’s role in the Anglo-American alliance and its implications for British post-war foreign policy.

Keywords

Europe Turkey Arena Defend Roumania 

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Copyright information

© Matthew Jones 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Royal HollowayUniversity of LondonUK

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