Reforming International Communication: The NWICO Debate

  • Mark D. Alleyne
Part of the St Antony’s/Macmillan Series book series

Abstract

The discussion so far in this book has been an explanation of the structure of power as far as the role of information and communication are concerned in international relations. There now needs to be an analysis of exactly what happens when these structures are challenged. Such a task might contain objective lessons for those who are relatively powerless and are seeking change. At the same time it might show up serious shortcomings and contradictions in the arguments of those who shout ‘cultural imperialism’ and place most blame for the status quo on the shoulders of those with power.

Keywords

Income Expense Malaysia Egypt Argentina 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Mark D. Alleyne 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark D. Alleyne
    • 1
  1. 1.National Center for Freedom of Information Studies, Department of Communication, College of Arts and SciencesLoyola University of ChicagoUSA

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