Research and Development Competition and Innovation in the Video Cassette Recorder Industry

  • Joung-hae Seo
Part of the Studies in the Modern Japanese Economy book series

Abstract

This chapter examines a significant example of accumulation of technology in post-war Japan: the development process of the VCR for home use, and the dynamic evolution process of the mass market. The purpose of this analysis of the Japanese home VCR industry is two-fold: the first is to clarify how and why only the Japanese makers had succeeded in developing home VCR and thus dominated the global mass market; and the second is to clarify the dynamic process of industrial evolution.

Keywords

Europe Expense Exter Monopoly Oligopoly 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abernathy, William J. (1978) The Productivity Dilemma: Roadblock to Innovation in the Automobile Industry (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press).Google Scholar
  2. Baba, Yasunori and Ken-ichi Imai (1990) ‘Systematic Innovation and Cross-border Network: The Case of the Evolution of the VCR Systems’, paper presented at the Schumpeter Society Conference on Entrepreneurship, Technological Innovation, and Economic Growth: International Perspectives.Google Scholar
  3. Cusumano, Michael A., Yiorgos Mylonadis and Richard S. Rosenbloom (1992) ‘Strategic Maneuvering and Mass-Market Dynamics: The Triumph of VHS over Beta’, Business History Review, 66, 1 (Spring).Google Scholar
  4. Dempa Shimbunsha, Denshi Kōgyō Nenkan (Almanac: Electronic Industry) various issues (Tokyo: Dempa Shimbunsha).Google Scholar
  5. Dosi, Giovanni (1984) Technical Change and Industrial Transformation: The Theory and Application to the Semiconductor Industry (London: Macmillan).Google Scholar
  6. Imai, Ken-ichi (1986) ‘Kigyō Senryaku to Sangyō Soshiki’ (Corporate Strategy and Industrial Organization), Business Review, 31, 1 (August).Google Scholar
  7. Itomi, Hiroyuki (1989) Nippon no VTR Sangyō: Naze Sekai wo Seiha Dekitanoka (The Japanese VCR Industry: How Japan Dominated the Market) (Tokyo: NTT Press).Google Scholar
  8. Japanese Industrial Association of Electronics (1986) Statistics for Major Items in World Electronic Industry.Google Scholar
  9. Katz, Michael L. and Carl Shapiro (1985) ‘Network Externalities, Competition and Compatibility’, American Economic Review, 75, 3 (June).Google Scholar
  10. Nakagawa, Yasuzō (1984) Nippon no Jikikiroku Kaihatsu (Development of Magnetic Recording Technology in Japan) (Tokyo: Daiamondosha).Google Scholar
  11. Nakagawa, Yasuzō (1987) Jisedai Video Sensō (War for Next VCR) (Tokyo: Daiamondosha).Google Scholar
  12. Nelson, Richard R. and Sidney G. Winter (1982) An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press).Google Scholar
  13. Nakagawa, Yasuzō and Michael A. Cusumano (1987) ‘Technological Pioneering and Competitive Advantage: The Birth of the VCR Industry’, California Management Review, 29, 4 (Summer).Google Scholar
  14. Sakuma, Akimitsu, Yoshiki Matsui and Masahiro Horiuchi (1987) ‘Kōzō Shinka to Inobēshon’ (Evolution of Market Structure and Innovation: Development of U.S. Personal Computer Industry), Business Review, 35, 2 (December).Google Scholar
  15. Seo, Joung-hae (1991) ‘Sangyō Shinka ni okeru Kyōsō to Kyōchō’ (Cooperation and Competition in the Industrial Evolution), Business Review, 39, 1 (December).Google Scholar
  16. Teece, David J. (1986) ‘Profiting from Technological Innovation: Implications for Integration, Collaboration, Licensing and Public Policy’, Research Policy, 15, 6 (December).Google Scholar
  17. Yano Economic Institute, Dictionary of Japanese Market Share (various issues) (Tokyo: Yano Economic Institute).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Ryōshin Minami, Kwan S. Kim, Fumio Makino and Joung-hae Seo 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joung-hae Seo

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations