Why Move? Regional and Long Distance Migrations of Gujarati Jains

  • Marcus Banks
Part of the St Antony’s book series

Abstract

The anthropologist studying migration is in the position that he or she must consider it ex post facto, or at least as a process that has already been set in motion (as indeed must be done with many other facets of social life). All explanations as to the cause of migration are therefore made with the benefit of hindsight and carry with them a sense of inevitability. Far more difficult then, perhaps even more difficult than predicting which sections of populations may migrate in the future, is to explain why certain populations have not migrated. While the explanation may cause difficulty, it should not — in theory — be too difficult a problem to investigate in the field. A difficulty arises, however, when a broader historical and geographical context is taken into account, as I shall discuss.

Keywords

Migration Expense Agglomeration Prefix Sudan 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited  1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcus Banks

There are no affiliations available

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