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Developing a Conceptual Framework for Peacekeeping

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Abstract

Conceptual confusion over the UN’s role in the post-Cold War world is manifest. Boutros-Ghali has argued that ‘[p]eace enforcement must be an option, for diplomacy without strength will not be regarded as serious’.1 His case for enforcement is argued vigorously in An Agenda for Peace and elsewhere.2 Contradicting these arguments for the use of force, he commented during a visit to Mozambique, ‘[w]e need peace but we cannot impose peace’.3 Perhaps most accurate was his comment in a speech to the United Nations Association in the United States where he said, ‘[n]ew and complex questions arise every day. We do not yet have the answers.’4 These statements are indicative of a general confusion over how to deal effectively with conflicts like those in Somalia and former Yugoslavia. This chapter puts forward one option which might usefully be developed and applied toward the goal of finding better means of managing both potential and on-going conflicts.

Keywords

Conflict Resolution Conflict Management Contingency Model Contingency Approach Conflict Process 
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Notes and References

  1. 1.
    UN Doc. SG/SM/5159, 18 November 1993.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Boutros-Ghali, 1992a, pp. 24–7; B. Boutros-Ghali (1992b), ‘Empowering the United Nations’, Foreign Affairs, 72(5):89–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    UN Doc. SG/T/1822, 18 October 1993.Google Scholar
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    This point is made in Boutros-Ghali, 1992a.Google Scholar
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    Peacekeeper’s Handbook, 1984, p. 2.Google Scholar
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    Bercovitch et al, p. 8–9.Google Scholar
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    Bercovitch et al., 1991; Fisher and Keashly, 1991.Google Scholar
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    Bercovitch et al., 1991, p. 15.Google Scholar
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    This conclusion is also reached by Diehl, 1988, p. 505.Google Scholar
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    See Miall, 1990; Bercovitch et al., 1991; Azar, 1990; Burton, 1987 and Vol 1, 1990.Google Scholar
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  29. 29.
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  30. 30.
    See R.J. Fisher, 1989; Rothman, 1989; Kelman, 1978.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Interview in The Guardian, 23 May 1992.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    For example, a data-set might be all multidimensional operations carried out by the UN. Alternately, a data-set might include all UN peacekeeping operations.Google Scholar
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    Bercovitch et al., 1991, pp. 13 and 17.Google Scholar
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  38. 38.
    See Bercovitch et al., 1991; Fisher and Keashly, 1991.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    For more discussion of this integration in UNTAG see Chapter 3.Google Scholar
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    K Skjelsbaek (1989), ‘United Nations peacekeeping and the facilitation of withdrawals’, Bulletin of Peace Proposals, 20(3):261.Google Scholar
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    See UN Doc. A/45/502; Wiseman, 1991.Google Scholar
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    See Prein, 1984; Glasl, in Bomens and Peterson, 1982; R.J. Fisher, 1989, 1990; Fisher and Keashly, 1988, 1991; Wehr and Lederach, 1991; Coate and Puchala, 1990.Google Scholar
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    Wehr and Lederach, 1991, p. 98.Google Scholar
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    Coate and Puchala, 1990, p. 133.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Coate and Puchala, 1990, p. 133.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Diehl and Kumar, 1991, p. 375.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© A. B. Fetherston 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peace Research CentreThe Australian National UniversityAustralia

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