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The Causes of Poverty: A Study Based on the Mauritania Living Standards Survey 1989–90

  • Harold Coulombe
  • Andrew McKay
Part of the Case-Studies in Economic Development book series (CASIED)

Abstract

Given that poverty is ultimately a problem at the individual or household level, an understanding of its nature and causes can only properly be developed at the micro-economic level. In any given social and economic environment, poverty will affect different households to different extents, these differences reflecting differences in the resources at their command, in the constraints they face and in their economic behaviour. To understand and specify more precisely the nature and relative importance of these various factors requires an analysis at the individual household level, which in turn requires the availability of a detailed household survey data set containing information on the economic and socio-economic characteristics of households and their members.

Keywords

Poverty Line Household Level Welfare Measure Poverty Status Poverty Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Tim Lloyd and Oliver Morrissey 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harold Coulombe
  • Andrew McKay

There are no affiliations available

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