Caribbean Coast Guard and Naval Capabilities

  • Michael A. Morris

Abstract

Maritime forces of the Caribbean islands include both navies and coast guards. There is considerable variation between these offshore forces with regard to both capabilities and functions. A few can perform a variety of offshore security functions, but none are formidable fighting forces. Most Caribbean states have either neglected the development of meaningful naval and coast-guard capabilities or simply cannot provide them. Moreover, the capabilities of the United States and other external powers engaged in the Caribbean overshadow those of the islands.

Keywords

Fishing Malaysia Argentina Nigeria Indonesia 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Michael A. Morris, Expansion of Third-World Navies (London: Macmillan, and New York: St Martin’s Press, 1987).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Pilar Armanet, Políticas Marítimas Sudamericanas (Santiago, Chile: Comisión Sudamericana de Paz, Documento de Estudio No. 6, 1991) pp. 9–15.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Charles W. Koburger, Jr, Narrow Seas, Small Navies, and Fat Merchantmen: Naval Strategies for the 1990s (New York: Praeger, 1990) p. 86.Google Scholar
  4. 7.
    Sheila Harden (ed.), Small is Dangerous: Micro States in a Macro World (London: Frances Pinter Publishers, 1985) pp. 84–6.Google Scholar
  5. 8.
    HQ, US Forces Caribbean, ‘The Caribbean Regional Coast Guard Program’ The DISAM Journal of International Security Assistance Management, 8 (Fall 1985) p. 59.Google Scholar
  6. 9.
    David E. Simcox, ‘The Regional Coast Guards’ Proceedings, US Naval Institute, 111 (July 1988) p. 47.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Michael A. Morris 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael A. Morris
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceClemson UniversityUSA

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