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Recent Trends in Economic Inequality in the United States: Income versus Expenditures versus Material Well-being

  • Susan E. Mayer
  • Christopher Jencks
Part of the Jerome Levy Economics Institute book series

Abstract

Official income statistics suggest that the United States did not protect the economic interests of its poorest citizens very effectively during the 1970s and 1980s. According to the Census Bureau’s best published estimates, the average American family’s real annual pre-tax money income rose 12 percent during the 1970s and 11 percent during the 1980s. Among the poorest fifth of all families, in contrast, real income rose 6 percent during the 1970s and fell 4 percent during the 1980s.2 By 1989 the distribution of family income was more unequal than at any time since the Census Bureau began collecting such data in 1947.3

Keywords

Income Inequality Current Population Survey Economic Inequality Doctor Visit Money Income 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dimitri B. Papadimitriou and Edward N. Wolff 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan E. Mayer
  • Christopher Jencks

There are no affiliations available

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