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Energy Efficiency

  • Stuart Johnson
  • Andrew Wilkes
Chapter
Part of the Macmillan Building and Surveying Series book series

Abstract

The government energy-saving campaign ‘Helping the Earth Begins at Home’ launched in Autumn 1991 stated that domestic fuel bills could be cut by 20 per cent or more by straightforward changes such as improved insulation and draught-proofing. The campaign stresses the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions as well as pointing out the possibility of lower bills. This action is an advance of an international agreement on the use of fossil fuels and global warming which is expected to be signed in 1992. Given that demand for electricity is increasing world-wide, particularly in less developed countries, it is possible that the UK and other developed nations will have to reduce consumption of fossil fuels by about 50 per cent over the course of the next thirty to thirty-five years. Reductions in energy consumption of this order are feasible and after the initial pay-back period, saving would have an appreciable affect on individuals’ living standards and companys’ profitability [1]. If there is one theme underlying the increased awareness about environmental issues, it is that our squandering of energy and other resources must end.

Keywords

Energy Efficiency Thermal Insulation Life Cycle Cost Green Building Heat Pump System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Further reading

  1. Building Research Establishment, Thermal Insulation: Avoiding the Risks — A guide to Good Practice Building Construction ( Watford: BRE and HMSO, 1989 ).Google Scholar
  2. CIBSE Guide — Volumes A, B, C (London: Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, 1988 and updates).Google Scholar
  3. S. Curwell, C. March and R. Venables (eds), Buildings and Health -The Rosehaugh Guide to the Design, Construction, Use and Management of Buildings ( London: RIBA Publications, 1990 ).Google Scholar
  4. Department of the Environment and the Welsh Office, The Building Regulations 1991, Conservation of Fuel and Power, Approved Document L1 ( London: HMSO, 1991 ).Google Scholar
  5. N. Dudley, Good Health on a Polluted Planet ( London: Thorsons, 1991 ).Google Scholar
  6. Energy and the environment survey’, The Economist (31 August 1991) pp. 5–44.Google Scholar
  7. Eurisol UK Mineral Wool Association, Reducing the Greenhouse Effect by Domestic Insulation ( St Albans: Eurisol, 1991 ).Google Scholar
  8. R. Flanagan and G. Norman, Life Cycle Costing for Construction ( London: Surveyors’ Publications, July 1983 ).Google Scholar
  9. R. Flanagan, G. Norman, J. Meadows and G. Robinson, Life Cycle Costing — Theory and Practice ( Oxford: BSP Professional Books, 1989 ).Google Scholar
  10. G. J. Hughes (ed.), Electricity and Buildings ( London: Peter Peregrinus Ltd, 1984 ).Google Scholar
  11. Hunkin, Almost Everything There is to Know ( London: Octopus Ltd, 1990 ).Google Scholar
  12. D. Pearson, The Natural House Book ( London: Conran Octopus Ltd, 1989 ).Google Scholar
  13. S. Rock (ed.), Director’s Guide to Energy Management ( London: The Director Publications Ltd, September 1991 ).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Stuart Johnson and Andrew Wilkes 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Johnson
  • Andrew Wilkes

There are no affiliations available

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