Triggering Further Progress in Health in the Developing World

  • Guy Carrin
  • Marc Vereecke
Chapter
Part of the Economic Issues in Health Care book series (EIHC)

Abstract

The concern about good health can be said to be universal. Despite this, health status is very unequal across the world’s nations. Differences in health appear to be associated to a large extent with the economic status of countries. In industrial market economies, which had an average gross national product (GNP) per capita of $14,670 in 1987, life expectancy at birth averaged 76 years. By contrast, in the low-income developing countries (LIDCs), which had an average GNP per capita of $278 in 1987, the equivalent figure was only 52 years.

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Copyright information

© The authors and contributors 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guy Carrin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marc Vereecke
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of AntwerpBelgium
  2. 2.School of Public HealthBoston UniversityUSA

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