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Interest Groups

  • Rod Hague
  • Martin Harrop
  • Shaun Breslin
Chapter
Part of the Comparative Government and Politics book series (CGP)

Abstract

There is a story, possibly true, that New Zealand Premier Sid Holland was once woken by a phone call from an irate woman who could not find a plumber willing to come out in the middle of the night to fix a leak. (This being New Zealand, the premier’s number was in the phone book, even if plumbers go ex-directory after hours.) A plumber soon arrived on her doorstep thanks to Holland’s direct intervention (Du Fresne 1989). Another story — undeniably true — is that in 1989, the cities of Eastern Europe were filled with people demonstrating their profound dissatisfaction with communist rule, demonstrations that accelerated the collapse of communism in Europe.

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Key reading

  1. Wilson, G. (1990) Interest Groups (Oxford: Blackwell). A good recent treatment, dealing with liberal democracies.Google Scholar
  2. Ball, A. and Millward, F. (1986) Pressure Politics in Industrial Societies (London: Macmillan). Covers both first and second worlds.Google Scholar
  3. Cigler, C. and Loomis, B. (eds) (1985) Interest Group Politics (Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press). Examines the interest group anthill in the United States.Google Scholar
  4. Olson, M. (1982) The Rise and Decline of Nations (New Haven: Yale University Press). The most trenchant and controversial interpretation of interest-group activity in recent years.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Rod Hague, Martin Harrop and Shaun Breslin 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rod Hague
  • Martin Harrop
  • Shaun Breslin

There are no affiliations available

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