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Revolution, Ideology and Political Change

  • Rod Hague
  • Martin Harrop
  • Shaun Breslin
Chapter
Part of the Comparative Government and Politics book series (CGP)

Abstract

The world of nation-states we inhabit today results from changes that have taken place over centuries. Some of these changes have been gradual. For example, developments in technology are fundamental to our world, but they tend to take place regularly and steadily. Political change, however, tends to be irregular. Long periods of calm are punctured by intense periods of change, the effects of which are felt for generations. This means we cannot just concentrate on the peaceful periods. To understand the political landscape of today, we must also analyse the political earthquakes of the past.

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Key reading

  1. Marx, K. and Engels, F. (first pub. 1848, many editions) The Communist Manifesto. One of the most influential political works of the modern era.Google Scholar
  2. Cohan, A. (1975) Theories of Revolution (London: Nelson). A lucid analysis of Marxist, functionalist and social psychological ideas on revolution.Google Scholar
  3. Skocpol, T. (1979) States and Social Revolutions: A Comparative Analysis of France, Russia and China (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). A justly influential work.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bakhash, S. (1985) The Reign of the Ayatollahs (London: Tauris). An accessible introduction to the Iranian revolution.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Rod Hague, Martin Harrop and Shaun Breslin 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rod Hague
  • Martin Harrop
  • Shaun Breslin

There are no affiliations available

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