Advertisement

The Constitutional Framework

  • Rod Hague
  • Martin Harrop
  • Shaun Breslin
Chapter
Part of the Comparative Government and Politics book series (CGP)

Abstract

Most nation-states have a formal constitution. Until recently, however, the study of constitutions was only a major theme of political analysis within liberal democracies. This was because liberal democracy is partly defined as constitutional government: that is, as government in accordance with, and limited by, formal rules. In addition, several liberal democracies — including Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden — have adopted new constitutions since 1970. This has given new impetus to constitutional studies.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Key reading

  1. Bogdanor, V. (ed.) (1988) Constitutions in Democratic Politics (Aldershot: Gower). A useful volume, reviewing constitutional issues and experience in sixteen liberal democracies.Google Scholar
  2. O’Brien, D. (1986) Storm Center: The Supreme Court in American Politics (New York: Norton). A lively account of a fascinating institution.Google Scholar
  3. Forsyth, M. (ed.) (1989) Federalism and Nationalism (Leicester University Press). Assesses the experience of federalism around the world.Google Scholar
  4. Wright, D. (1988) Understanding Intergovernmental Relations (Pacific Grove, Calif: Brooks Cole). An informed assessment of contemporary American federalism.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Rod Hague, Martin Harrop and Shaun Breslin 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rod Hague
  • Martin Harrop
  • Shaun Breslin

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations