The Nature of Anglo-Argentine Diplomacy, 1980–1990

  • Guillermo Makin

Abstract

It is a statement of the obvious to say that in the 1980s Anglo-Argentine relations underwent several changes. Despite them the danger of tension, even conflict, persists. The nature of the dispute has been only imperfectly addressed. In many quarters in both countries the return to diplomatic normality, coupled with the raising of trade restrictions and the lifting of the Military Exclusion Zone, has been welcomed as signifying a momentous change. But diplomacy must be the means to an end — the end being a compromise, perhaps embodied in the form of a treaty, that is politically acceptable to the elected governments of both countries.

Keywords

Assure Hunt Fishing Argentina Aires 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Giovanni Sartori, Parties and Party Systems, a Framework for Analysis (Cambridge: Cambridge, 1976) pp. 121–2. Relevant political actors are those who can make and unmake governments. This ability is determined by electoral strength, coalition potential or by ability to blackmail.Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    For a full development of the evidence based on government releases, La Prensa, La Nación and La Opinion, G.A. Makin, ‘Political Crises in Argentina: 1955 and 1975–76’, University of Cambridge PhD dissertation, 1985. For violence aimed at the centre of the political spectrum, idem, ‘Argentina, the Authoritarian Impasse’, in C. Clapham and G. Philip (eds), The Political Dilemmas of Military Regimes, (London: Croom Helm, 1985), especially p. 169.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Lawrence Freedman, Britain and the Falklands War (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1988), p. 67.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Alex Danchev 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guillermo Makin

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