1916–21: A Press of One’s Own

  • John Mepham
Part of the Macmillan Literary Lives book series

Abstract

With the publication of her first novel behind her, Virginia Woolf regained her composure. She had found that a viable way of living was after all possible. She was to have a marriage, but it would be without sex. She would not have children. In spite of everything, she and Vanessa remained close. Above all, she had proved herself as a writer. Her career had begun. She was thirty-three and she still had a very long way to go before she would find her own distinctive way of writing. But the terrible experiences of the years 1910–15 were never to be repeated with anything like that ferocity.

Keywords

Depression Mercury Smoke Liner Fishing 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Jane Marcus is right to emphasise the analogy with The Magic Flute in her ‘Enchanted Organ, Magic Bells: Night and Day as a Comic Opera’ in Virginia Woolf and the Languages of Patriarchy (Indiana University Press, 1988) p. 18f.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Sally Dennison, Alternative Literary Publishing: Five Modern Histories (University of Iowa Press, 1984) p. 73.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Eileen Traub, ‘The Early Years of the Hogarth Press’, American Book Collector, vol. 7, October 1986, pp. 32–6.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    See Phyllis Rose, Woman of Letters: A Life of Virginia Woolf (Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978) p. 279, note 17.Google Scholar
  5. 6.
    Suzette Henke, ‘Virginia Woolf Reads James Joyce: The Ulysses Notebook’, in eds Morris Beja, Phillip Herring et al., James Joyce: The Centennial Symposium (University of Illinois Press, 1986) pp. 39–42.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
    Richard Ellmann, James Joyce (Oxford University Press, 1982) p. 403.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Mepham 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Mepham

There are no affiliations available

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