Legal Issues in Retailing

  • W. Stewart Howe
Chapter

Abstract

In all business organisations, the law exerts a considerable influence on management. It is essential, therefore, that retail managers have a clear understanding of their rights and duties under the civil and criminal law — and appreciate the penalties that may be incurred by them or their employer if they fail to remain within the law in exercising their managerial functions. Some reference has already been made in a number of earlier chapters to the role of the law in retailing. In this chapter legal issues are explored in more detail. The main areas to be considered are the legal relationships between retailers and their suppliers, customers and employees. Planning and competition issues have already been dealt with in the previous chapter.

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Copyright information

© W. Stewart Howe 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Stewart Howe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Business StudiesDundee Institute of TechnologyScotland

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