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Needs Theory, Social Identity and an Eclectic Model of Conflict

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Conflict: Human Needs Theory

Part of the book series: The Conflict Series

Abstract

The appeal of Needs Theory is that it offers additional support and a fresh perspective for the appropriateness and utility of the problemsolving approach to conflict resolution.

Portions of this chapter are taken from R. J. Fisher, The Social Psychology of Intergroup and International Conflict Resolution, SpringerVerlaag Publishers, New York, 1990, with permission of the publisher.

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© 1990 John Burton

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Fisher, R.J. (1990). Needs Theory, Social Identity and an Eclectic Model of Conflict. In: Burton, J. (eds) Conflict: Human Needs Theory. The Conflict Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-21000-8_5

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