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Employment, Unemployment and Industrial Policy

  • Richard Breen
  • Damian F. Hannan
  • David B. Rottman
  • Christopher T. Whelan

Abstract

Since the founding of the State, Ireland has been unable to create jobs on a scale sufficient to meet the requirements of its potential growth in population. The consequences of such failure have been high levels of unemployment among the employee labour force and high rates of emigration. In this chapter our purpose is to examine the way in which the Irish State has sought to address the employment problem, particularly in the post-1958 period — through industrial, public sector and manpower policy — and the resulting consequences. Of particular concern to us, of course, are the questions of how these policies have influenced the class structure of Irish society, and the degree to which the particular strategies pursued reflect the autonomy and capacity possessed by the State in this area. We begin, however, with a discussion of the current unemployment situation and an attempt to outline the dynamics of the Irish employment problem.

Keywords

Labour Force Employment Growth Industrial Policy Labour Market Position Labour Force Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Richard Breen, Damian F. Hannan, David B. Rottman, Christopher T. Whelan 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Breen
    • 1
  • Damian F. Hannan
    • 1
  • David B. Rottman
    • 2
  • Christopher T. Whelan
    • 1
  1. 1.The Economic and Social Research InstituteDublinIreland
  2. 2.National Center for State CourtsWilliamsburgUSA

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