D. H. Lawrence pp 160-165 | Cite as

Providing: 1929–30

  • John Worthen
Part of the Literary Lives book series (LL)

Abstract

All his life Lawrence had been financially careful; he remained strict about small sums of money as much as about large ones. He was not a good business man, because he did not devote himself assiduously enough to making money or to organising his affairs, though, as Frieda once wrote, ‘Had he succumbed to the “passion for possessions”, he, with his great intelligence directed that way, would have made pots…’1 But his letters show innumerable examples of his shrewdness and carefulness. He had once remarked to Dorothy Brett that ‘I would loathe to draw a cheque if I thought it wouldn’t be covered: it’s sort of false’ (Letters, V, p. 426). He paid his bills promptly and — if short of money — tried to ensure that he had few bills. He always paid on the nail for services rendered. A friend typed for him, and received the instruction: ’count the thousands, and I’ll pay the current rate. 1/- per 1000, 3d for carbon’ (ibid., p. 343). His Florentine doctor, submitting a bill, was prepared to take a copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover to be going on with, but Lawrence commented ‘Really, I much prefer to pay him. One doesn’t want to have those things unpaid’.2

Keywords

Income Expense 

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Notes

  1. 9.
    Edward Nehls, D. H. Lawrence: A Composite Biography, Vol. III (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1959 ) p. 406.Google Scholar
  2. 12.
    Apocalypse and the Writings on Revelation edited by Mara Kalnins (Cambridge University Press, 1979) p. 149–11.20–1.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Worthen 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Worthen
    • 1
  1. 1.OberhausenGermany

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