Poems

  • Tom Winnifrith
  • Edward Chitham
Part of the Macmillan Literary Lives book series (LL)

Abstract

It seems clear enough that one of the major effects on Emily of her stay in Belgium was to direct her attention more firmly to literary composition. A similar effect was noticeable after her ‘exile’ at Law Hill. Now, returning from M. Heger’s influence, and bereft of her two sisters and Branwell, she found herself with time for poetic experiment. It is quite likely that Gondal prose writing also received a fillip in those early months of the first part of 1843, when Charlotte was still across the water and both Anne and Branwell were at Thorp Green, but we are unlikely ever to know any more about that side of Emily’s artistic production. Only the poems remain from the Gondal saga. It is certain that Gondal occupied part of Emily’s mind in February 1843, when she wrote a lengthy narrative about the fall of Zalona, a city now attacked by Julius Brenzaida, the fierce Gondal monarch who was eventually to be transformed into Heathcliff.

Keywords

Welding Editing Stake Heroine Ster 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    E. Chitham, The Poems of Anne Brontë (London, 1979) Introduction and notes, passim. Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    Reviews collected by M. Allott in The Brontës, The Critical Heritage (London, 1974).Google Scholar

Suggestions for Further Reading

  1. W. Gerin, Charlotte Brontë: The Evolution of Genius (Oxford, 1966) Chapters 16, 17.Google Scholar
  2. E. Chitham and T. Winnifrith, Selected Brontë Poems (London, 1984).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Tom Winnifrith and Edward Chitham 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom Winnifrith
    • 1
  • Edward Chitham
    • 2
  1. 1.University of WarwickUK
  2. 2.The PolytechnicWolverhamptonUK

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