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Abstract

‘Man is born free,’ said Rousseau, ‘and everywhere he is in chains.’ His reference was to political constraints; I borrow his phrase to emphasise the more widespread compulsion imposed by time upon the supposed liberty of human action. Choices made at a given time depend on earlier choices.

Keywords

Italian Peninsula Grand Strategy Paradise Lost Ally Strategy Ally Auth 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    Text in J. M. A. Gwyer and J. R. M. Butler, History of the Second World War: Grand Strategy, Vol. III (London, 1964), Appendix I.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    Field Marshal Alexander’s Despatch. Supplement to London Gazette 12 June 1950, p. 2580. Full text in M. E. Howard, History of the Second World War: Grand Strategy, Vol. IV (London, 1972) Appendix VI (D),p. 669.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    N. Hamilton, Monty: Master of the Battlefield 1942–44, Vol. II (London, 1983) p. 420. ‘No one knew why the Allies were in Italy, apart from the need to “knock Italy out of the war” and to take possession of the Foggia airfields’; omitting the fundamental object of the campaign and inserting from a different document a subsidiary object.Google Scholar
  4. 7.
    John Ehrman, History of the Second World War: Grand Strategy, Vol. V (London, 1956) pp. 80–81.Google Scholar
  5. 9.
    cf. E. Barker, British Policy in South-East Europe in the Second World War (London, 1976) p. 122. One result, as she points out, was to complicate negotiations with Romanian opposition leaders.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© British National Committee for the History of the Second World War 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Hunt

There are no affiliations available

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