Advertisement

Eating and Sleeping Problems

  • Michael Kerfoot
  • Alan Butler
Part of the Practical Social Work book series (PSWS)

Abstract

Childhood development is an area which contains a good deal of scope for the genesis of problems, and is something about which many parents experience a high degree of anxiety. Every day, parents (particularly mothers) are reminded of what is supposedly ‘normal’; in childhood development, either via popular magazines, television, and radio, or by direct contact with other mothers and their children. Comparisons are inevitable between both parents and their own children, and those of other people, and gradually an awareness of differences in development may grow which in turn may provoke parental anxiety. Many of these differences in maturation may simply reflect the normal variations which occur among children regarding ages and stages in development, but others will indicate a more specific delay which may be problematical. There are then two dimensions to developmental problems. The first is the parental reaction, which may not be a reflection of a legitimate problem, but which has to be responded to regardless of its cause. The second is the rate at which the child matures which, similarly, may constitute a genuine problem, or one which will in time resolve itself. The art lies in being able to respond sympathetically to both parents, and child, regardless of the ultimate cause of their concern.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© British Association of Social Workers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Kerfoot
  • Alan Butler

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations