Cultural Difference and Cultural Deprivation: A Theoretical Framework for Differential Intervention

  • Mogens R. Jensen
  • Reuven Feuerstein
  • Yaacov Rand
  • Shlomo Kaniel
  • David Tzuriel

Abstract

The theory of Structural Cognitive Modifiability (SCM) (Feuerstein, 1977; 1979, 1980; Feuerstein and Jensen, 1980; Feuerstein, Jensen, Hoffman and Rand, 1985) identifies as ‘culturally different’ individuals or groups who have benefitted from learning experiences whereby their culture was mediated to them. It identifies as ‘culturally deprived’ those who have not been inducted into their own culture due to the inadequate provision of such learning experiences. Drawing on the paradigm of the Mediated Learning Experience (MLE) this chapter analyses the etiology of cultural difference and cultural deprivation and examines the implications of this distinction for the development of differential approaches to the educational intervention required for the individual confronting the need to adapt and change.

Keywords

Assimilation Tempo 

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References

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Copyright information

© Rajinder M. Gupta and Peter Coxhead 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mogens R. Jensen
  • Reuven Feuerstein
  • Yaacov Rand
  • Shlomo Kaniel
  • David Tzuriel

There are no affiliations available

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