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Knowledge by Acquaintance and Description

  • Brian Haymes
Part of the Library of Philosophy and Religion book series

Abstract

In the two previous chapters, concerned with inferential and immediate knowledge, the use of the verb ‘to know’ has been considered in relation to propositions expressed in clausal form, ‘I know that P.’ However, the verb is not always followed by a clause. It may also govern a noun in the accusative case, ‘I know A.’ Objects or persons may be ‘known’ as well as propositions, for example, ‘I know Exeter’, ‘I know John.’ Philosophers describe this use as knowledge by acquaintance.1

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Notes

  1. 2.
    B. Russell, ‘Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description’7 in Mysticism and Logic (London: Longmans, Green, 1919) pp. 209-32Google Scholar
  2. The Problems of Philosophy (London: Oxford University Press 1973) ch. 5.Google Scholar
  3. and The Problems of Philosophy (London: Oxford University Press 1973) ch. 5.Google Scholar
  4. 7.
    H. H. Price, Belief (London: Allen & Unwin, 1969) p.69.Google Scholar
  5. 9.
    As it is for example by D. W. Hamlyn, The Theory of Knowledge (London: Macmillan, 1973) p.105.Google Scholar
  6. 10.
    Cf. P. Helm, The Varieties of Belief (London: Allen & Unwin, 1973) p.80.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Brian Haymes 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Haymes
    • 1
  1. 1.Northern Baptist CollegeManchesterUK

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