Land Reform and Collectivisation

  • Michel Chossudovsky
Chapter

Abstract

Present policies of decollectivisation carried out since the death of Mao Zedong and the fall of the group of Four take place against a long-standing struggle between opposing factions within the Chinese Communist Party with regard to agricultural policy. The ‘rectification movements’ carried out at various times since Liberation, and more particularly by Liu Shaoqi in the aftermath of the Great Leap Forward, represented important setbacks in the construction of socialist agriculture. Past ‘rectification’ policies, however, were unable to destroy the basis of the collective economy in the countryside.

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Copyright information

© Michel Chossudovsky 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel Chossudovsky
    • 1
  1. 1.AylmerCanada

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