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Routes to Military Dictatorship: A Comparative Essay on Argentina, Chile and Greece

  • Nicos P. Mouzelis
Chapter
Part of the New Studies in Sociology book series

Abstract

In chapter 1 the focus was on the fact that the state, city and market in the parliamentary semi-periphery had expanded before industrial capitalism could experience any large-scale development, and it was argued that this sequence had a profound impact on the formation of post-oligarchic political institutions. In the present chapter I shall try to show systematically and in some detail how the above is relevant to the emergence of military dictatorial regimes in three specific countries of the parliamentary semi-periphery: Argentina (1966), Greece (1967), and Chile (1973). For the sake of convenience I shall, when referring to all three of these societies, use the abbreviation ACG — Argentina, Chile, Greece.

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Notes and References

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© Nicos P. Mouzelis 1986

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  • Nicos P. Mouzelis

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