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Ageing and social problems

  • Peter G. Coleman
Chapter
Part of the Psychology for Professional Groups book series (PPG)

Abstract

The study of ageing and problems associated with it are now recognized as important. This is not surprising, for older people have become the major clients of the health and social services. They also have a lot of free time at their disposal. If there is to be an expansion in adult education and opportunities for creative leisure activities, the benefits should go especially to retired people.

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Bibliography

  1. Birren, J.E. and Schaie, K.W. (eds) (1977) Handbook of the Psychology of Ageing. London: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
  2. Brearley, C.P. (1975) Social Work, Ageing and Society. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  3. Bromley, D.B. (1974) The Psychology of Human Ageing (2nd edn). Harmondsworth Penguin.Google Scholar
  4. Carver, V. and Liddiard, P. (eds) (1978) An Ageing Population (Open University text). Sevenoaks: Hodder & Stoughton.Google Scholar
  5. Chown, S.M. (ed.) (1972) Human Ageing. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  6. Dibner, A.S. (1975) The psychology of normal aging. In M.G. Spencer and C.J. Dorr (eds), Understanding Aging: A multidisciplinary approach. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts. Google Scholar
  7. Gray, B. and Isaacs, B. (1979) Care of the Elderly Mentally Infirm. London: Tavistock.Google Scholar
  8. Kastenbaum, R. (1979) Growing Old — Years of Fulfilment. London: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  9. Kimmel, D.C. (1974) Adulthood and Ageing. An interdisciplinary developmental view. Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
  10. Miller, E. (1977) Abnormal Ageing. The psychology of senile and presenile dementia. Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
  11. Neugarten, B.L. and associates (1964) Personality in Middle and Later Life. New York: Atherton Press.Google Scholar

Annotated reading

  1. Brearley, C.P. (1975) Social Work, Ageing and Society. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. A book written for social workers, bringing together a wide range of material from medicine, psychology and sociology.Google Scholar
  2. Bromley, D.B. (1974) The Psychology of Human Ageing (2nd edn). Harmondsworth: Penguin. Written by a British psychologist, it gives a very thorough coverage of subjects such as changes in performance and cognitive skills with age, and is good on the methodological issues involved in doing research on ageing.Google Scholar
  3. Carver, V. and Liddiard, P. (eds) (1978) An Ageing Population (Open University Text). Sevenoaks: Hodder & Stoughton. A collection of readings for the Open University course. The papers have been drawn from a variety of sources to provide a multidisciplinary perspective on the needs and circumstances of the elderly.Google Scholar
  4. Gray, B. and Isaacs, B. (1979) Care of the Elderly Mentally In firm. London: Tavistock. A specialized book on the elderly mentally infirm also intended for social workers, written jointly by a geriatrician and a social worker.Google Scholar
  5. Kastenbaum, R. (1979) Growing Old — Years of Fulfilment. London: Harper & Row. A short introduction to the subject written by an American psychologist. He presents a balanced approach to old age, giving due weight to positive perspectives. The book is also attractively illustrated.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The British Psychological Society 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter G. Coleman

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