Ageing and social problems

  • Peter G. Coleman
Chapter
Part of the Psychology for Professional Groups book series

Abstract

What more telling example can there be of Bannister’s third part of the definition of the self (p. 12) that ‘We entertain the notion of our own continuity over time; we possess our biography and we live in relation to it’, than the geriatric patient’s poem cited by Peter Coleman on p. 116? Unless you are able to look past the label ‘geriatric’ you will fail to communicate with the old person, let alone understand him or her.

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Reference

  1. Simpson, M.A. (1979) The Facts of Death. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar

Bibliography

  1. Birren, J.E. and Schaie, K.W. (eds) (1977) Handbook of the Psychology of Ageing. London: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
  2. Brearley, C.P. (1975) Social Work, Ageing and Society. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  3. Bromley, D.B. (1974) The Psychology of Human Ageing (2nd edn). Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  4. Carver, V. and Liddiard, P. (eds) (1978) An Ageing Population (Open University text). Sevenoaks: Hodder & Stoughton.Google Scholar
  5. Chown, S.M. (ed.) (1972) Human Ageing. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  6. Dibner, A.S. (1975) The psychology of normal aging. In M.G. Spencer and C.J. Dorr (eds), Understanding Aging: A multidisciplinary approach. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.Google Scholar
  7. Gray, B. and Isaacs, B. (1979) Care of the Elderly Mentally Infirm. London: Tavistock.Google Scholar
  8. Kastenbaum, R. (1979) Growing Old — Years of Fulfilment. London: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  9. Kimmel, D.C. (1974) Adulthood and Ageing. An interdisciplinary developmental view. Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
  10. Miller, E. (1977) Abnormal Ageing. The psychology of senile and presenile dementia. Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
  11. Neugarten, B. and associates (1964) Personality in Middle and Later Life. New York: Atherton Press.Google Scholar

Annotated reading

  1. Brearley, C.P. (1975) Social Work, Ageing and Society. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. A book written for social workers, bringing together a wide range of material from medicine, psychology and sociology.Google Scholar
  2. Bromley, D.B. (1974) The Psychology of Human Ageing (2nd edn). Harmondsworth: Penguin. Written by a British psychologist, it gives a very thorough coverage of subjects such as changes in performance and cognitive skills with age, and is good on the methodological issues involved in doing research on ageing.Google Scholar
  3. Carver, V. and Liddiard, P. (eds) (1978) An Ageing Population (Open University Text). Sevenoaks: Hodder & Stoughton. A collection of readings for the Open University course. The papers have been drawn from a variety of sources to provide a multidisciplinary perspective on the needs and circumstances of the elderly.Google Scholar
  4. Gray, B. and Isaacs, B. (1979) Care of the Elderly Mentally Infirm. London: Tavistock. A specialized book on the elderly mentally infirm also intended for social workers, written jointly by a geriatrician and a social worker.Google Scholar
  5. Kastenbaum, R. (1979) Growing Old — Years of Fulfilment. London: Harper & Row. A short introduction to the subject written by an American psychologist. He presents a balanced approach to old age, giving due weight to positive perspectives. The book is also attractively illustrated.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The British Psychological Society 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter G. Coleman

There are no affiliations available

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