Speech style and employment selection: the matched-guise technique

  • Peter Ball
  • Howard Giles

Abstract

AIMS. This exercise demonstrates a method used to study speech in interpersonal evaluation. Actual speech rate and pronunciation feature among manipulations, and perceived speech rate and pronunciation feature among measures. Several points of methodology are introduced to students, besides research areas concerned with language, attitudes and person-perception, and potential applications in education and business.

Keywords

Europe Borate Ghost Editing Allo 

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Useful introductory reading for students

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Copyright information

© The British Psychological Society 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Ball
  • Howard Giles

There are no affiliations available

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