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Conclusion

Sequence, Crux and Means: Some Asian Nationalisms Compared
  • D. A. Low
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Part of the Macmillan Asian Histories Series book series

Abstract

For most of the first half of the twentieth century Western imperial rule had stretched over most parts of South and Southeast Asia—British rule in South Asia, Malaya, Singapore and North Borneo; Dutch in Indonesia; French in Indochina; American in the Philippines.

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Sources

  1. 1.
    In addition to the foregoing chapters and a number of the works cited in the Guide to Further Reading at the end of this book, I have also had occasion to refer to the following. For the Philippines: Usha Mahajani, Philippines Nationalism (St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1971).Google Scholar
  2. For India: Robin Jeffrey, ‘Matriliny, Marxism and the Birth of the Communist Party in Kerala, 1930–40,’ Journal of Asian Studies, XXXVIII, 1 (Nov. 1978) pp. 77–98;Google Scholar
  3. Roger Stuart, ‘The Formation of the Communist Party of India, 1927–37: the Dilemma of the Indian Left’, PhD thesis, Australian National University, 1979.Google Scholar
  4. For Vietnam: John T. McAlister, Vietnam: the Origins of Revolution (New York: Knopf, 1969).Google Scholar
  5. For Burma: U Maung Maung, From Sangha to Laity: Nationalist Movements of Burma, 1920–40, (Canberra/New Delhi: ANU Monographs on South Asia, No. 4, 1980).Google Scholar
  6. For China: Lucien Bianco, Origins of the Chinese Revolution, 1915–59 (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 1971);Google Scholar
  7. Jerome Ch’en, Mao and the Chinese Revolution (London: Oxford University Press, 1965);Google Scholar
  8. Jean Chesnaux, Peasant Revolts in China, 1840–1949 (London: Thames and Hudson, 1973);Google Scholar
  9. C. P. Fitzgerald, The Birth of Communist China Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1964),Google Scholar
  10. Chalmers A. Johnson, Peasant Nationalism and Communist Power: the Emergence of Revolutionary China, 1937–45(Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 1962);Google Scholar
  11. S. R. Schram, Mao Tse-tung (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1966),Google Scholar
  12. B. I. Schwartz, Chinese Communism and the Rise of Mao (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1951).Google Scholar

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© D. A. Low 1981

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  • D. A. Low

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