Transition: Understanding and Managing Personal Change

  • Barrie Hopson
Chapter
Part of the Psychology for Professional Groups book series

Abstract

The review of stress, and more specifically the discussion of life events on pp. 297–300, has already indicated that the individual’s experience can affect both his health and his psychological well-being. There can be little doubt, for instance, that life experiences (even pleasant events) do increase the risk of a broad range of physical and psychological disorders. In some cases, life events have a direct causal effect in producing a problem (e.g. experiences involving loss increase the risk of depression) whilst in others they maintain or exacerbate an existing condition (as in the effects of emotional involvement in the family on relapse in schizophrenia). Life events are, however, inevitable and affect most individuals. If this is accepted, what can be done to facilitate the task of coping with life’s problems, and also deriving some benefit from the process?

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References

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Annotated reading

  1. Adams, J.D., Hayes, J. and Hopson, B. (1976) Transition: Understanding and managing personal change. London: Martin Robertson. This is the first attempt to provide a conceptual framework to describe the psychological sequence of a transition. It is primarily a theoretical book, although some guidelines for the practitioner are available.Google Scholar
  2. Hopson, B. and Scally, M. (1980) How to cope with and gain from life transitions. In B. Hopson and M. Scally, Lifeskills Teaching Programmes No. 1. Leeds: Lifeskills Associates. This is for a classroom teacher of young people and consists of a series of carefully described group exercises to teach young people about transitions and how to cope more effectively with them.Google Scholar
  3. Parkes, C. Murray (1975) Bereavement: Studies of grief in adult life. Harmondsworth: Penguin. This book is about more than bereavement, although it is discussed at great length. Parkes generalizes from bereavement to other aspects of separation and loss in people’s lives.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The British Psychological Society 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barrie Hopson

There are no affiliations available

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