Dental Caries pp 275-304 | Cite as

Prevention of Caries by Increasing the Resistance of the Tooth

  • L. M. Silverstone
  • N. W. Johnson
  • J. M. Hardie
  • R. A. D. Williams
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter deals with the prevention of dental caries by increasing the resistance of the tooth. Increasing the resistance of the tooth to carious dissolution will be dealt with under three specific headings. The topical application of fluoride agents is a well-recognised caries-preventive procedure. The development of these agents, clinical trials, and their mechanisms of action will be discussed in the first section. In the second, the development and use of fissure sealants will be discussed. The use of sealants on occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth can act as a physical barrier on caries-susceptible surfaces which are least benefited by fluoride. The topic of re-mineralisation will be discussed in the third section. Remineralisation has already been dealt with in connection with the formation of the histological zones in the small lesion of enamel caries (chapter 6). However, in this section, remineralisation will be discussed in more general terms in order to obtain a broader perspective.

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© L. M. Silverstone, N. W. Johnson, J. M. Hardie and R. A. D. Williams 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. M. Silverstone
  • N. W. Johnson
  • J. M. Hardie
  • R. A. D. Williams

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