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Managerial Strategies of Organisational Control

  • Edmund Brooks
Chapter

Abstract

All organisations employ a management system of one kind or another for directing and controlling the operations of its different specialised functions and units. At the simplest level it involves senior management deciding on what it wants to achieve, issuing orders and making sure that these are consistently and reliably carried out. With the increasing size of organisations and the complexity of operations associated with the division of labour, a more extensive and elaborate control system is necessary to ensure that patterns of human behaviour align with the demands and responsibilities of the job and that people comply to certain desired norms of behaviour related to organisational standards.

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© Edmund Brooks 1980

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  • Edmund Brooks

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