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Growth, Puberty and Ageing

  • D. J. Begley
  • J. A. Firth
  • J. R. S. Hoult
Chapter

Abstract

The meaning of the word ‘growth’ as used by biologists contains some elements that are not immediately obvious from its common use. Growth usually implies an increase in physical dimensions such as length or mass. This can be measured throughout both prenatal and postnatal development and provides a first approach to the detailed biological analysis of growth. In this sense, growth is usually taken to exclude temporary fluctuations in otherwise stable dimensions due to accumulation of fat or water.

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Further reading

  1. Lamb, M. J. (1977). Biology of Ageing, Blackie, GlasgowGoogle Scholar
  2. Sinclair, D. (1978). Human Growth After Birth, 3rd edn, Oxford University PressGoogle Scholar
  3. Strehler, B. L. (1977). Time, Cells and Aging, 2nd edn, Academic Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Tanner, J. M. (1978). Foetus into Man: Physical Growth from Conception to Maturity, Open Books, LondonGoogle Scholar
  5. Timiras, P. S. (1972). Developmental Physiology and Aging, Macmillan, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© D. J. Begley, J. A. Firth and J. R. S. Hoult 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Begley
    • 1
  • J. A. Firth
    • 2
  • J. R. S. Hoult
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.St George’s Hospital Medical SchoolLondonUK

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