Blockade: 1806–9

  • Clive Emsley
Chapter

Abstract

Pitt’s death was not a cue for national mourning; in Royton old Jacobins prepared for an illumination and a mock funeral; in Hull bets were taken that the war would soon be at an end.1 Others were less sanguine about the prospects of peace, and even Fox had doubts. Rightly so, for during the next four years the war was to spread even further across the globe: British troops and fleets were engaged in Holland and Spain, the length and breadth of the Mediterranean, and from the Baltic to South America. The economic struggle between Britain and France was highlighted by Napoleon’s Berlin and Milan Decrees and Britain’s Orders in Council; neutrals were dragged into the conflict which led to a serious confrontation between Britain and the United States. Furthermore Britain continued the war without an outstanding national leadership, with a succession of bad harvests, and with several major sectors of the economy exerting pressure for peace.

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References

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Copyright information

© Clive Emsley 1979

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  • Clive Emsley

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