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Paraplegia pp 91-105 | Cite as

The role of modern sex therapy applied to paraplegia

  • Graham Powell
Chapter
  • 11 Downloads
Part of the Progress in Rehabilitation book series (PRORE)

Abstract

In this chapter sex therapy is considered in physical and psychological terms. The sex act comprises several distinct stages, each of which can be considered later in relation to paraplegia.

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© The Contributors 1984

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  • Graham Powell

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