Control of Restrictive Trade Practices

  • M. S. Bradbury
Part of the Case Studies in Economics book series (STEC)

Abstract

Under the general heading of restrictive trade practices, we are concerned with two particular activities. First, collusive agreements made between firms in an industry, which impose restrictions on such things as the prices to be charged, conditions of sale, or quantities to be supplied. Second, the stipulation by the manufacturer of a price at, or above, which the retailer must resell his product (called resale price maintenance — R.P.M.) if he is not to run the risk of having sanctions applied against him.

Keywords

Sugar Income Expense Defend Undercut 

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Sources and References

  1. C. Brook, The Control of Restrictive Practices from 1956: A Study of the Restrictive Practices Court (1966).Google Scholar
  2. R. B. Stevens and B.S. Yamey, The Restrictive Practices Court: A Study of the Judicial Process and Economic Policy(1965).Google Scholar
  3. B. S. Yamey, The Economics of Resale Price Maintenance (1951).Google Scholar
  4. B. S. Yamey, (ed.), Resale Price Maintenance (1966). A collection of papers by various authors, dealing with R.P.M. in selected countries.Google Scholar
  5. O.E.C.D., Guide to Legislation on Restrictive Business Practices. Gives details of the monopoly and restrictive practices legislation of member states. Details of British legislation and summaries of Monopoly Commission reports and Restrictive Practices Court cases can be found in vol. III, which also contains an excellent bibliography. The Guide is continuously updated.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© C. T. Sandford and M. S. Bradbury 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. Bradbury

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