Development Problems of Backward Areas in Hungary

  • L. Köszegi
Part of the International Economic Association Conference Volumes, Numbers 1–50 book series (IEA)

Abstract

In spite of the small area of Hungary (93,000 sq. km., with a greatest width east-west of 528 km. and north-south 268 km.), the geographical distributions of both population and economic activity are characterised by great variations and by a certain measure of concentration. A fundamental feature is the discrepancy between the Budapest agglomeration and the rural areas, and the associated differences in development levels.1

Keywords

Migration Europe Rubber Income Agglomeration 

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Notes

  1. In spite of the small area of Hungary (93,000 sq. km., with a greatest width east-west of 528 km. and north-south 268 km.), the geographical distributions of both population and economic activity are characterised by great variations and by a certain measure of concentration. A fundamental feature is the discrepancy between the Budapest agglomeration and the rural areas, and the associated differences in development levels.1Google Scholar
  2. For more detailed references see: L. Köszegi, ‘The Problems of the Budapest Agglomeration of Industry and Population in the Regional Planning of the Economy’. Paper submitted to the Conference of Senior Economic Advisers, U.N. — E.C.E., Geneva, November 1964.Google Scholar
  3. See also I. Bartke and J. Kóródi,’ General Problems of Industrial Development in the Country Areas of the Hungarian People’sRepublic’, Conference of Senior Economic Advisers, Geneva, 1964.Google Scholar
  4. A detailed analysis of regional development is contained in: Major Tendencies in the Regional Development of Productive Forces in 1961–65 (in Hungarian: study by the Institute of Planning, Regional Section, May 1966) and Major Trends in Regional Development of the Economy in the Second Five Year Plan, Central Statistical Office, Regional Department (under publication).Google Scholar
  5. See also Z. Tatai, ‘Topical Problems of Industrial Location’ (in Hungarian), Közgazdasági Szemle, no. 3 (1967).Google Scholar
  6. See L. Köszegi, ‘The Role of Regional Planning in National Economic Planning’. Paper submitted to the Conference of Senior Economic Advisers, Geneva, 1964.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Köszegi
    • 1
  1. 1.Central Planning OfficeBudapestHungary

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