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Domestic violence and pregnancy: a midwifery issue

  • Chris Bewley
  • Andy Gibbs
Chapter
Part of the Midwifery Practice book series (MIPRA)

Abstract

Domestic violence, sometimes called domestic abuse, can affect all members or ex-members of a family and can occur in same-sex relationships (Stanko 1997). Abuse can be physical, emotional, psychological or sexual and profoundly affects the everyday lives of many people, predominantly women and children. This chapter examines the nature and effects of abuse on individuals and on society, and includes research into the perpetrators of domestic violence. The effects of abuse on pregnant women and on children are discussed, together with their professional significance for midwives. Finally, suggestions are made for effective midwifery interventions using an interdisciplinary approach.

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Limited 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Bewley
  • Andy Gibbs

There are no affiliations available

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