Varieties of Social Theories: A Brief Introduction

  • Tony Bilton
  • Kevin Bonnett
  • Pip Jones
  • David Skinner
  • Michelle Stanworth
  • Andrew Webster
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces the student to the ideas of the classic sociological theorists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries — Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx and Max Weber — and then to twentieth-century developments in sociological theories. After reading this chapter, the student should have an introductory knowledge of the history of sociological thought and be equipped with a vocabulary of concepts and terms with which to understand the other chapters in this book.

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Further Reading

  1. Cuff, E. C., Sharrock, W. W. and Francis, D. W. (1998) Perspectives in Sociology, Routledge, London. This fourth edition of a text first published in 1979 includes a new section devoted to contemporary debates surrounding post-structuralism and postmodernism. Reasonably accessible and coherent.Google Scholar
  2. Jones, Pip (1993) Studying Society: sociological Theories and andsearch Practices, Collins Educational, London. This text is written by the author of Chapter 4 and includes both an expansion of the ideas in this chapter and an attempt to relate theoretical commitment to research practice.Google Scholar
  3. Ritzer, G. (1996) Modern Sociological Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York. An extremely useful summary of sociological theorising: comprehensive, up-to-date and readable.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Tony Bilton, Kevin Bonnett, Pip Jones, David Skinner, Michelle Stanworth and Andrew Webster 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Bilton
  • Kevin Bonnett
  • Pip Jones
  • David Skinner
  • Michelle Stanworth
  • Andrew Webster

There are no affiliations available

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