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Methodological Issues in Assessing the Impact of Economic Reform on Poverty

  • Andrew McKay
Part of the Case-Studies in Economic Development book series (CASIED)

Abstract

The 1980s in particular saw significant increases in levels of poverty in much of the developing world, notably in much of Africa and in many countries in the Latin America and Caribbean region, as well as in some Asian countries. Over the same decade, many developing countries began to undertake economic reform programmes (e.g. stabilization and/or structural adjustment programmes), often though not exclusively with the encouragement and financial support of the International Monetary Fund and/or the World Bank. These economic reforms were generally undertaken as a response to a present or impending economic crisis. However, the question of whether, and if so how, these reform programmes were related to the increase in poverty is a very pertinent one. This issue has been discussed extensively by academics, international agencies, practitioners and the general public, and there is a wide diversity of views on it. At one extreme is the commonly expressed view that the reform programmes impacted disproportionately on the poor, and so contributed to increased poverty. At the opposite extreme, it is argued that economic reform measures were a necessary response to the preceding economic crisis, and may have resulted in more favourable outcomes than would have happened in the absence of these reforms.

Keywords

Real Exchange Rate Economic Reform Computable General Equilibrium Reform Programme Computable General Equilibrium Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew McKay

There are no affiliations available

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