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Arts in health promotion: a comparative overview of two health arts alliances

  • Helen Chambers
Chapter

Abstract

Arts in health care is often associated with hospital arts, theatre in health education or arts therapies. Increasingly, however, a variety of other health promoting roles are being developed by artists and health workers operating in the community. This chapter identifies two health promotion initiatives that demonstrate a range of health promoting functions enabled through an alliance of arts and health and implemented using contrasting models of health promotion. One is led by a local authority arts department and the other by a specialist health promotion agency. A rationale and description for the use of the arts in health promotion is provided, and discussion focuses upon the factors that influence the development of the alliance. Comment will be made upon the extent to which outcomes have been enhanced or impeded through partnership-working. Consideration will be given to the role of specialist health promotion officers in enabling health arts alliances.

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Copyright information

© Helen Chambers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen Chambers

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